Book Review: All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

Missing GirlsSynopsis from goodreads

It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.

The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.

Told backwards—Day 15 to Day 1—from the time Annaleise goes missing, Nic works to unravel the truth about her younger neighbor’s disappearance, revealing shocking truths about her friends, her family, and what really happened to Corinne that night ten years ago.

Review (no spoilers)-Brace yourselves for an unpopular opinion

I received this book from NetGalley.

 

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda is quite a unique book. As indicated in the synopsis, the story is told backwards. Well, I have never read anything else like this and I admit that it wasn’t really easy to adjust to the style. For the first time, I was tempted to go to the end of the book and just start from there but I guess that would have ruined the experience. Honestly, I was so confused by the layout in some instances.

Basically, the story is narrated from day 15 backwards to day 1. In this way, one chapter will give details of what happened on day 15 then the next chapter now goes back to day 14 and henceforth.

Characters

The character development was done really well. However, I found almost all characters to be pretty unlikeable. I guess this is the new way of writing psychological thrillers. For instance, Gillian Fyn’s Gone Girl and Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train had the same type of characters. In All the Missing Girls, I thought this worked out well. I didn’t like Nic but still found her to be quite compelling. I felt the same way about Laura, Daniel and Tyler, didn’t not like them much but still thought they were great for the role that they played. I think the only character that I didn’t have an issue with was Everett.

The Plot

The story-line was also pretty good with mystery sustained from the first page. I like it when I find a book with so many suspects. I think that I suspected almost every character at some point. It was hard to guess what exactly happened to the missing girls and who was responsible. Every time I thought I knew who was responsible, something else happened and I got a new suspect.

Final thoughts

I took some time to get into the story and get the backward narration style. Some chapters were more interesting than others and I kept wondering if this was caused by the narrative style. There were instances where the tension was completely lost because previous chapters already explained how the events would unfold. I had a number of highs and lows throughout the book shifting from excited and interested to just going through the pages.

I liked the fact that the author added two final chapters after day 1 that helped explain everything in a way. These chapters were narrated in chronological order.

I recommend this book to fans of thriller/suspense kind of novels. Readers who are interested in trying out something new that is, reading a story backwards should also get this book. However, I give this book 3 stars because the narration style did not work for me. It was a bit difficult for me to keep up with it despite the great plot-line and wonderful characterization. Get the book and read it though, many people seem to have enjoyed it so the narration style must have worked out well for most readers.

About the Book

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda
Published by Simon & Schuster on June 28th 2016
Genres: Thrillers & Suspense
Pages: 384
Format: DRC
Source: Netgalley
Buy from Amazon/Buy from Barnes & Noble/Buy from Book Depository
Goodreads

WWW-Wednesday #June 29th

This meme is currently hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words. To take part all you need to do is answer the following questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

So here’s my 3 W’s for the week.

Recently Finished

The Night Stalker by Robert BryndzaI really liked this book. You can read my ‘stunning’ review here.

Oh and I was definitely happy to receive these tweets from the author, Robert Bryndza.

 All the Missing Girls by Miranda Megan- My review of this book will be up on the blog tomorrow.

americanahOINTB Season 4

Okay, I just had to add this here. I had planned on spending the weekend indoors reading but I got season 4 of Orange is the New Black on Friday night and so all reading was set aside. I won’t say anything about the season because I don’t want to spoil it for anyone who hasn’t watched it yet. However, I have to say that I was super pleased to see Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi on OINTB. I saw the scene, paused and had to go back and confirm what I had seen. It is awesome to see how well that book has been received worldwide. I was also happy to hear Atticus Finch mentioned during another scene although the character said that Atticus is from Killing a Mocking Jay lol. It was a great season with some good bookish moments.

 

Currently reading

dear amyDear Amy by Hellen Calaghan

Synopsis from goodreads

Margot Lewis is the agony aunt for The Cambridge Examiner. Her advice column, Dear Amy, gets all kinds of letters – but none like the one she’s just received:

Dear Amy,
I don’t know where I am. I’ve been kidnapped and am being held prisoner by a strange man. I’m afraid he’ll kill me.Please help me soon,Bethan Avery

Bethan Avery has been missing for years. This is surely some cruel hoax. But, as more letters arrive, they contain information that was never made public. How is this happening? Answering this question will cost Margot everything

This book is quite interesting so far.

Reading Next

twistedTwisted by Hannah Jayne

Synopsis from goodreads

When her father is accused of being a serial killer, Bex becomes the ultimate bait in this game of cat and mouse

Bex is ready to start a new life in foster care. There, she won’t be known as a serial killer’s daughter. Though her father was never tried for the murders attributed to “The Wife Collector,” he disappeared after questioning. And Bex struggles with the guilt that she provided the circumstantial evidence that convicted him in the public’s perception—and drove him to abandon her.

But when a body turns up in her new hometown, all signs point to the Wife Collector. Bex’s old life isn’t ready to let her go. The police want to use Bex to lure in her father. But is she baiting a serial killer or endangering an innocent man?

So how about you, any interesting books that you have read lately? What are you reading now? What do you plan on reading next? Feel free to leave your WWW links in the comments section.

Top 5 Wednesday: Settings I want to see more of

#T5W

It’s that time of the week again when I bring you the Top 5 Wednesdays, created by gingerreadslainey and hosted by Sam @ThoughtsOnTomes. If you want to know how T5W works you can go to the Goodreads group by clicking here.

The instructions for this week were as follows:

June 29th: Settings you want to see more Of-These can be time periods (historical or futuristic) or places (real or fictitious)!I decided to base my post on places where some of my favorite books were located.

 

Paris or anywhere in France– Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins. My review of the book is here.

Barcelona-The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Zafon Ruiz.My review of the book is here.

India, Italy(in particular Venice) and ThailandEat, Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert. This book gave me serious wanderlust. It made me appreciate traveling even more.

I saw a book set in Seychelles recently. Unfortunately, I can’t even remember that title but that is a setting I would love to see too.

So, which are your favorite settings? Have you been to Paris, Barcelona, India, Thailand or Italy? I hope that those places are as beautiful as I imagine them to be. If you did this week’s T5W, leave your link in the comment section, I would love to see your favorite settings.

TTT:Ten Books that I loved but Never Wrote a Review for

toptentuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by  The Broke and the Bookish. Each week, bloggers get a topic which entails giving a list of ten things based on the topic.

Today’s instructions were as follows: FREEBIE WEEK – topic of your choice or go back and do one you missed! So I decided to do a post about some of my favorite books that I loved but read before starting book blogging so I never reviewed them. This is a topic that was tackled on TTT a few months back.

Top Ten Books that I loved but Never Wrote a Review for

  1. Gone Girl by Gillian Fynn
  2. Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozie
  3. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
  4. The Firm by John Grisham
  5. A Time to Kill by John Grisham
  6. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  7. Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
  8. She’s Come Undone by Wally Lamb
  9. A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks
  10. A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Those are my top ten books that I loved but never reviewed. What are yours? Did you participate in today’s Top Ten Tuesday? What did you opt to talk about? Share the links to your TTT posts.

Book Review: Vulnerable (Morgans of Nashville #4) by Mary Burton

mary burtonSynopsis

The Smallest Mistake

Three went in; one came out. For five years, no trace has been found of two high-school friends who went hiking in the woods near Nashville. The third teen, Amber Ryder, was discovered at the bottom of a ravine with a broken arm, head trauma–and zero memory of the horror that put her there.

Will Put You

What started as a cold case has become a fresh hell for forensic technician Georgia Morgan. Another woman’s body is found in the woods, and it leads to the missing teens’ remains. But while Georgia works with Amber to try and reawaken her memories, her gut tells her the worst is yet to come.

At A Killer’s Mercy

Homicide Detective Jake Bishop can’t be sure whether Amber is an expert manipulator or the killer’s next target. Either way, he’s determined to protect Georgia. Because the deeper she digs into the past, the deadlier the secrets that emerge, and a nightmare years in the making is about to come to a bloody, terrifying end…

Review (no spoilers)

I didn’t read any reviews of this book in advance. If I had then I would have found out that it’s the fourth book in a series called Morgan of Nashville by Mary Burton. I don’t think I would have read it then because I haven’t read any of the other three books in the series.

What I liked

The Vulnerable by Mary Burton is an interesting book. It is quite fast paced starting off with a murder that takes place right at the beginning of the book.  I don’t usually read police procedural kind of books because I get lost in the details of the investigations, the forensics and all that. However, this book was quite interesting despite the fact that Georgia Morgan, the protagonist was a forensics analyst.

I loved the suspense maintained throughout the book. I was only able to guess the identity of the killer in the final chapters. In addition, every time I thought that I had figured out the story, a new twist occurred throwing me completely in a different direction.

What I didn’t like

Something that I found to be somewhat amusing was the delivery of the twists. I felt as if these twists were just dropped… unceremoniously. I don’t know how to explain it but it is like…Oh, that guy is the killer now, moving on… I usually expect more of a buildup of the tensions and suspense before the twist. The OMG moments that makes a good thriller.

Another thing that I wasn’t too keen on was the romance and the detailed sex scenes.  Again, I didn’t read any reviews beforehand so I didn’t know that this was supposed to be a romantic thriller. The romance and sex bugged me. I felt that these scenes were taking away the focus from the mystery at hand. I was expecting it to be more of a crime or psychological thriller. So I guess this part is my fault  and doesn’t really indicate that there was anything wrong with the storyline.

who dunnit

Apart from that, I truly enjoyed reading the book. Although it is supposed to be part of a series, this still felt like standalone and I don’t think I missed out on much by not reading the other three books first. I think I will read the whole series now.

About the Book

Paperback, 384 pages

Published March 29th 2016 by Pinnacle

Edition Language: English

Series: Morgans of Nashville #4

 

 

 

Book Review: I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

I am the messengerSynopsis from gooodreads

Ed Kennedy is an underage cabdriver without much of a future. He’s pathetic at playing cards, hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey, and utterly devoted to his coffee-drinking dog, the Doorman. His life is one of peaceful routine and incompetence until he inadvertently stops a bank robbery.

That’s when the first ace arrives in the mail.

That’s when Ed becomes the messenger.

Chosen to care, he makes his way through town helping and hurting (when necessary) until only one question remains: Who’s behind Ed’s mission?

Review (no spoilers)

I have mentioned this a thousand times already but let me just say it again; I absolutely loved The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. That will always remain one of my favorite books. I found I am the Messenger at the library and immediately picked it just based on the author.

I am the messenger is a beautiful book. It’s a lovely story about 19 year old Ed Kennedy and the messages that he has to deliver. Each message brings some change in other people’s lives. The stories are endearing and so are all the characters. Due to the number of messages, there are a couple of short stories within the main story.

The Writing….

This book is very easy to get into. The story has such an easy flow and as usual, Markus Zusak writes really beautifully. He has a way with words. I especially like how well he manages to use personification in his writing. For instance; In The Book Thief, death was the character, he was actually the narrator. In I am the Messenger, everything has a personality. For instance, the breeze is caught staring and looks away shyly. The dog is one of the main characters and he has conversations with Ed and they drink coffee together all the time. I just really love how Markus uses that particular stylistic device. I also liked they element of mystery. Each message presented a challenge and it was interesting trying to find out whether Ed would succeed or not. The idea that readers also don’t get to know who gives Ed the messages is also intriguing.

The Quotes…

There were also a number of quotes that I liked. Some of my favorite quotes include;

“Believe it or not–it takes a lot of love to hate you like this.”
Markus Zusak, I Am the Messenger

“If a guy like you can stand up and do what you did, then maybe everyone can. Maybe everyone can live beyond what they’re capable of. ”
Markus Zusak, I Am the Messenger

“Maybe one morning I’ll wake up and step outside of myself to look back at the old me lying dead among the sheets.”
Markus Zusak, I Am the Messenger

The Characters…

The characters are wonderful. Ed who is the main character is brave, considerate and funny. I loved his relationship with his group of friends, Audrey, Marv and Ritchie. They way they would hang out playing cards, Christmas dinner and all their wonderful experiences together. They guys were so funny. I kept laughing throughout the book due to the antics of these four friends. I simply adored the relationship between Ed and his dog, The Doorman. They were such an interesting pair.

My only issue with the book….

I am not really a fan of happily ever-after narratives so my only issue with this book is the ending. I don’t want to spoil it for those who haven’t read it but let me just say that I don’t like when everything is wrapped up neatly at the end. It is a bit cliché like those movies that end with a kiss and the perfect soundtrack…ugh

messenger.jpg

Finally…

I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak is a nice read. I think that fans of YA will appreciate it more although it is one of those feel-good stories that anyone can enjoy.

 

Book Review: The Night Stalker (DCI Erika Foster #2)by Robert Bryndza

Synopsis from goodreads

StalkerIf the Night Stalker is watching, you’re already dead…

In the dead of a swelteringly hot summer’s night, Detective Erika Foster is called to a murder scene. The victim, a doctor, is found suffocated in bed. His wrists are bound and his eyes bulging through a clear plastic bag tied tight over his head.

A few days later, another victim is found dead, in exactly the same circumstances. As Erika and her team start digging deeper, they discover a calculated serial killer – stalking their victims before choosing the right moment to strike.

The victims are all single men, with very private lives. Why are their pasts shrouded in secrecy? And what links them to the killer?

As a heat wave descends upon London, Erika will do everything to stop the Night Stalker before the body count rises, even if it means risking her job. But the victims might not be the only ones being watched… Erika’s own life could be on the line.

 

Review (no spoilers)

Thank you NetGalley and Bookouture for giving me a copy of this book.

I really enjoyed The Girl in the Ice which is the first book in the DCI Erika Foster series by Robert Bryndza. You can read my review here. Naturally, I was excited when I found out that a second book had been released.

Like the first book, The Night Stalker is well paced and the story moves along quite fast. I was pulled into the story right from the page and kept struggling to put it down. In the first chapter, the mystery had already been introduced and the first murder had occurred.

Unlike the narrative in The Girl in the Ice, we now get to know the identity of the killer a bit sooner. However, the mystery is still not lost. It is interesting to see how the detectives work together to catch the killer.

I also liked the fact that there was so much going on at the same time. We have the murders and a serial killer on the loose, a heat wave, another ongoing case involving child pornography, some chemistry between characters, a novelist with a weird fascination.  All these events help create some drama and move the story along.

I liked the character of DCI Erika Foster in this book more than I did in the first one. There is still a lot of drama surrounding her mainly due to her tendency to go rogue. However, she is still brilliant and likable especially in this book when we see her forming more relationships and connections with other characters. I love the fact that Erika has her complexities too. She has demons from her past due to the death of her husband and this keep haunting her. In the first book, her work situation bothered me but this time round, even the dramas played into building the complex character that makes Erika so endearing.

There were also a number of other likeable characters. In particular; I liked Peterson and Moss who were introduced to readers in the first book. Dr. Strong was also quite a memorable and endearing character. I am not kidding when I saw I liked most of the characters. I even liked one who was in comatose almost throughout the book. Robert Bryndza did a wonderful job with the character development. He also threw in a few other characters who made the book quite intriguing.

I liked the serial killer’s twist. I can’t say anything more about this without spoiling the book because one of the main twists of the story has to do with the killer. I’ll just say that it was nice to see something different from the norm.

Another thing that I enjoyed was the shifting perspectives. The book is mainly narrated from the perspective of DCI Erika. However, there are few chapters where the perspective shifts to different characters including the serial killer’s. This helped in the flow of the narration and in understanding of the characters’ actions.

I don’t want to say too much about the book because of spoilers but seriously, if you enjoy reading thrillers/mystery then you definitely need to read Robert Bryndza books. You can start with The Girl in the Ice just so that you can get familiar with the characters. However, you can still enjoy reading The Night Stalker as a standalone. Brilliant, enjoyable and thrilling page turner, I give this book 5 stars.

 

About the Book
Kindle Edition, 384 pages
Published June 2nd 2016 by Bookouture
Original Title: The Night Stalker

 Plea to all my followers: I changed my  blog’s url yesterday.I just found out that my posts stopped appearing on my follower’s reader. If you can see this,please click on unfollow and then follow again to  to get my posts on your reader. Thanks. Diana, previously of Voices in my head

Friday Finds#June 25

 

Friday Finds is a meme currently hosted by http://booksandabeat.comThis is an opportunity to share the books that you have recently found and added to your TBR.

As I mention on my WWW Wednesday post this week. I joined NetGalley and got a few books(now at 14,good lord!). This week, my Friday Finds showcase three books that I decided to start with.

 

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

Missing GirlsIt’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.

The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.

Told backwards—Day 15 to Day 1—from the time Annaleise goes missing, Nic works to unravel the truth about her younger neighbor’s disappearance, revealing shocking truths about her friends, her family, and what really happened to Corinne that night ten years ago.

This book will be published on June 28th 2016

 

The Step Mother by Claire Seeber

STEP MOTHERThe perfect wife. A fairytale family. Don’t believe your eyes…

Jeanie and Matthew are a happily married couple who both have teenage children from previous relationships.No one said it would be easy to raise a blended family under one roof but Jeanie and Matthew are strong. They will make it work.

And whilst Jeanie’s step-daughter Scarlett rejects her, Jeanie will just have to try harder to win her over.But Jeanie has a past. A terrible secret she thought she’d buried a long time ago. And now, it’s coming to the surface, threatening to destroy her new marriage.

Someone is playing a terrifying game on Jeanie and she must put a stop to it once and for all.After all, a fairytale needs a happy ending … doesn’t it?

This book will be published on July 15th 2016 2016

 

My Girl by Jack Jordan

my girlPaige Dawson: the mother of a murdered child and wife to a dead man.

She has nothing left to live for… until she finds her husband’s handgun hidden in their house.

Why did Ryan need a gun? What did he know about their daughter’s death?

Desperate for the truth, Paige begins to unearth her husband’s secrets.

But she has no idea who she is up against, or that her life isn’t hers to gamble – she belongs to me.

This book will be published on July 4th 2016

 

How about you? Did you add any books to your bookshelf this week? Have you read of my new finds? Let me know.

Happy Friday. Its cold and wet in Nairobi, Kenya so I plan on being indoors and reading all weekend. Enjoy your weekend.

3435-Reading-On-A-Rainy-Day

 

Ps: if you read this post and you are already following my blog. Kindly un-follow me then click follow again. I changed my url and unknowingly, my blog no longer appears on my follower’s reader unless its new followers. Please follow me again.New followers are also welcome. Thanks y’all.

Book Review: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

A Haven for Book Lovers

 narrow roadSynopsis

Richard Flanagan’s story — of Dorrigo Evans, an Australian doctor haunted by a love affair with his uncle’s wife — journeys from the caves of Tasmanian trappers in the early twentieth century to a crumbling pre-war beachside hotel, from a Thai jungle prison to a Japanese snow festival, from the Changi gallows to a chance meeting of lovers on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Taking its title from 17th-century haiku poet Basho’s travel journal, The Narrow Road To The Deep North is about the impossibility of love. At its heart is one day in a Japanese slave labour camp in August 1943. As the day builds to its horrific climax, Dorrigo Evans battles and fails in his quest to save the lives of his fellow POWs, a man is killed for no reason, and a love story unfolds.

 Review (no spoilers, just a few beautiful quotes)

The…

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Book Review: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

 narrow roadSynopsis

Richard Flanagan’s story — of Dorrigo Evans, an Australian doctor haunted by a love affair with his uncle’s wife — journeys from the caves of Tasmanian trappers in the early twentieth century to a crumbling pre-war beachside hotel, from a Thai jungle prison to a Japanese snow festival, from the Changi gallows to a chance meeting of lovers on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Taking its title from 17th-century haiku poet Basho’s travel journal, The Narrow Road To The Deep North is about the impossibility of love. At its heart is one day in a Japanese slave labour camp in August 1943. As the day builds to its horrific climax, Dorrigo Evans battles and fails in his quest to save the lives of his fellow POWs, a man is killed for no reason, and a love story unfolds.

 Review (no spoilers, just a few beautiful quotes)

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan was our Book Club’s book of the month. At first I was intimidated by the book so much that I waited until the final week before review to read it.

My biggest challenge with this book was the timelines. There is a lot of back and forth. One chapter the main character, Dorrigo Evans, is in his 70s then mid chapter he is again 4 years old and then 20 years old all in one chapter. The narration moves from different timelines, countries, alternating narrators and so forth. The protagonist seems to jump from one woman’s bed to the next one. That kept throwing me off. I am used to reading books with a different kind of flow and sequential occurrence of events.

During our book club meeting, Linda, one of the members explained that the flow of events reflects the working of a human mind. It is natural for humans to think that way. One minute you start thinking about the kids, the book that you want to read then you remember something else. She thought that Flanagan used this technique to express the Dorrigo’s thought process as naturally as possible. This gave me a new perspective into the book.

Once I got used to the mixed timeline, I was sucked into the story, Richard Flanagan writes so well. The protagonist, Dorrigo loved books and so there were a number of beautiful quotes that would resonate with any reader.

“A good book … leaves you wanting to reread the book. A great book compels you to reread your own soul.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North

“He believed books had an aura that protected him, that without one beside him he would die. He happily slept without women. He never slept without a book.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan is written in such raw language that successfully depicted the horrors of war. The description of the camps and treatment of Prisoners of War (POWs) were definitely heartbreaking. The effect of war on men was devastating.

POWs_Burma_Thai_RRThe story revolves around the construction of the Thai- Burma railway construction and the experience of the Australian soldiers held as prisoners by the Japanese. The soldiers were forced to construct the railway. Dorrigo who was a doctor at the camp narrates of the harrowing experiences of the POWs. There are heartbreaking tales of starvation, illnesses such as cholera, deaths and just unimaginable torture.

Image of POWs at the Burma railway construction

At the background of the POWs struggles, there is also a narrative of a love story. Dorrigo falls in love during the war. His love for literature was also remarkable. This added to the beauty of the narration.

“There are words and words and none mean anything. And then one sentence means everything.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North

The Narrow Road to the Deep North is not the easiest reads. It will require your concentration as a reader. However, once you get through the first 50 pages or so then you will find yourself enjoying the writing even more. It’s a difficult story with heavy themes but at the same time, it’s a story about a man trying to survive an ugly ordeal and fight his own demons. The book surprised me by also giving the Japanese a voice. It focused a lot on the POWs but also gave the perspective of the Japanese who imprisoned them.

The ending of the book is just like the rest of the book. There is no neatness in the wrapping up. I actually thought my book was missing some pages but no, that was it. It ended just like it began. However, I thought it was a befitting ending. I gave this book 4 stars and recommend it to fans of literature and especially historical fiction.

Below are two quotes that my book club really liked and took some time to discuss.

“Virtue was vanity dressed up and waiting for applause.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North

“He loved his family. But he was not proud of them. Their principal achievement was survival. It would take him a lifetime to appreciate what an achievement that was.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North